Saturday, December 03, 2011

Please welcome my friend, Lynda Lee Schaab, author of Mind Over Madi. We have a few fun questions and answers for you and then a little about her newest release.
~Angie



Is writing your only profession or do you have a “day job?”
I do freelance work, but I also work in a warehouse as part of a pricing group for Meijer. It doesn't sound all that glamorous (and it's not!) but I actually enjoy the physical work. It's a nice change from the mental strain that freelancing and creativity can cause. If I got a couple of additional regular writing gigs, though, I wouldn't mind staying home full time to do what I love to do most.

What is your favorite and least favorite part of being a writer?
Favorite: The creative process. Thinking a story through from beginning to end and then seeing my vision come to life through the characters and situations I create.


Least favorite: Definitely the self discipline it requires. Time management is something I've always struggled with. Making myself sit down and focus when I know the basement needs cleaning, laundry is piling up, my office needs to be organized, or I want to watch the episode of Survivor I missed the night before is my biggest challenge.

What is Mind over Madi about? Tell us a little about the plot.
Madi McCall is a 38-year-old mom of three whose insecurities are destroying her marriage. When she suspects her husband Rich is cheating with the mother of one of his fourth grade students, she kicks him out of the house and he moves in with his bachelor brother. Madi is then forced to take a deeper look at herself and her insecurities. She does this with the help of a counselor, her best friend Sylvie, and a few cartons of Edy's Dibs. At a 20-year get-together with former high school classmates, Madi runs into “the other woman” and things come to a head. It's a lighthearted story about taking a true look at ourselves and accepting God's grace when we think and do dumb things.


On the cover photo, “Madi” is wearing a tiara. What is the significance in that?

Madi's therapist challenges her to think of herself as a princess - the daughter of the King. Madi has never thought of herself this way, and throughout the story, there are references to various Disney princesses as Madi tries to figure out which one she most relates to. I had fun with the theme, even giving “the other woman” the fairy tale-ish name of Fawn Witchburn.

What do you want readers to take away from reading Madi's story?
An understanding of just how infinite God's love is. That no matter what we've done, God will never stop pursuing our hearts or desiring a relationship with us. His mercies are new every morning and His grace covers our weaknesses, our mistakes, our ignorance.

Are you planning another book? If so, what is the story?
I am currently working on book #2 in the Madi series, titled, Madily in Love. Now that Madi and Rich are working things out, she attends a class at church to try to put the romance back into her marriage. But with her mother-in-law living with them, Madi's new job, and issues with her kids, things don't exactly go as planned. It's a fun book that will look at finding peace -and romance - in the middle of chaos.
 
Who or what inspires you?

People in general inspire me. Whether it's hearing a moving testimony or just witnessing someone's positive outlook on life, I find inspiration to be a better person by various people I meet. A good message from my pastor, a pep talk from a friend, or a song I hear on the radio. Inspiration is everywhere. All that's required is a heart to receive it.


What Bible verse is Mind over Madi based on?
Well, I have a couple of scriptures on which Mind over Madi is based. First, Isaiah 26:3 tells us that it's only when our minds are stilled, we'll have peace. “You will keep in perfect peace, those whose minds are steadfast, because they trust in you.”

Do you have a favorite personal Bible verse?
My favorite verse is Psalm 46:10: “Be still and know that I am God.” I recite this verse often! Because my mind is always so busy and distracted, I tend to stress out a lot. I need to keep reminding myself that God is God. He's in control. And everything will be okay.


What do you do for fun and relaxation when you're not writing?
I escape to the movie theater with my refillable bucket of popcorn. I'm sort of a television/movie junkie, and I blame it on my need for a good story. I also enjoy just hanging out with my kids, playing board games or video games (although it's been a while since I got crushed in Mario Kart). 
 
How can readers connect with you?
My website address is www.lyndaschab.com. I also have a blog with various writing and reading-related material at www.on-the-write-track.blogspot.com. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter.
 


BIO:
LYNDA LEE SCHAB got her writing start in greeting cards  (Blue Mountain Arts, Dayspring)  and from there  went on to write  articles and short stories (Mature Living, Christian Home &  School)  and in many places online (including www.Examiner.com and  www.wow-womenonwriting.com), but  her passion has always been fiction. 

Mind Over Madi, her debut novel, is near and dear to her heart.  Lynda admits  she has a lot in
common with  the character of Madi. Not only are they both  addicted to ice cream, chocolate, and computer games,  they  struggle with the same types of insecurities and continually require a hefty dose of God’s grace.

Lynda works behind the scenes at FaithWriters.com and is a member of ACFW. She is a regular book reviewer for FaithfulReader.com and is the Grand Rapids
Christian Fiction Examiner and the National Writing Examiner for Examiner.com.  Mind Over Madi  received Runner-up in the 2007 FaithWriters Page Turner contest, was a finalist in the 2007 RWA Get your Stiletto in the Door contest, and won second place in the 2008 ACFW Genesis contest, Chick Lit category. Lynda lives with her husband, Rob, and two teenagers in Michigan. 



About Mind Over Madi:

Madi McCall admits her husband lacks a little in the romance department, but all in all, he’s been a good husband, a good father. Now, though, she suspects Rich is having an af  air with Fawn Witchburn, the mother of one of his fourth-grade students. To say Fawn shows of   her “assets” more than should be legally allowed in public is an understatement, and Madi’s insecurities kick into high gear. When, in a heated moment, she asks Rich to leave and he complies, Madi is forced to deal with her issues. Issues of love and trust she’s tried so hard to avoid. Issues that trail all the way back to her childhood and make her act like a total moron.
Lynda Lee Schab
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